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Should USCBP be operating in Canadian airports?

I've long been uncomfortable with the fact that US Customs and Border Protection (USCBP) operates in major Canadian airports like Toronto Pearson. I don't recall when it occurred to me that the idea of USCBP operating within Canada was odd, but I haven't been able to shake the idea. Certainly, USCBP didn't endear themselves to … Continue reading Should USCBP be operating in Canadian airports?

On the general character of semantic theory (Part a)

(AKA Katz's Semantic Theory (Part IIIa). This post discusses chapter 2 of Jerrold Katz's 1972 opus. For my discussion of chapter 1, go here.) Having delineated in chapter 1 which questions a semantic theory ought to answer, Katz goes on in chapter 2 to sketch the sort of answer that a such a theory would give. … Continue reading On the general character of semantic theory (Part a)

The Scope of Semantics

If you've taken a semantics course in the past decade or two, or read an introductory textbook on the topic published in that time span, you probably encountered, likely at the outset, the question What is meaning? followed almost immediately with a fairly pat answer. In my experience, the answer given to that question was reference1---the meaning of an expression, say dog, is the set of things in the world that that expression refers to, the set of all dogs in this case.

Tarring Universal Grammar with the Brexit brush

Over at Psychology Today, Vyv Evans, cognitive linguist and UG critic, has written a piece criticizing generative linguistics, and those who defend its practice. In particular he criticizes what he sees as the shape-shifting nature of UG. I don’t want to address the substance of Evans’ piece, but rather a rhetorical choice he makes, specifically, … Continue reading Tarring Universal Grammar with the Brexit brush

Don’t believe the rumours. Universal Grammar is alive and well.

As I write this I am sitting in the Linguistics Department lounge at the University of Toronto. Grad students and Post-doctoral researchers are working, chatting, making coffee. Faculty members pop in every now and then, taking breaks from their work. It’s a vibrant department, full of researchers with varied skills and interests. There are those … Continue reading Don’t believe the rumours. Universal Grammar is alive and well.